School Media Associates
Free Shipping at School Media Associates
Login: New User
Call School Media Associates Order School Media
Sign-up for Special Offers
View Cart Contact SMA for School Media
Advanced Search
 


Titles for Black History Month



12 Years a Slave

Rated R

12 YEARS A SLAVE is based on an incredible true story of one man's fight for survival and freedom. In the pre-Civil War United States, Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a free black man from upstate New York, is abducted and sold into slavery. Facing cruelty (personified by a malevolent slave owner, portrayed by Michael Fassbender) as well as unexpected kindnesses, Solomon struggles not only to stay alive, but to retain his dignity. In the twelfth year of his unforgettable odyssey, Solomon's chance meeting with a Canadian abolitionist (Brad Pitt) forever alters his life.

$19.98

school media add cart


Abolishing Slavery in America

The enslavement of millions of African Americans stands as one of the darkest periods in the history of the United States. Explore significant events in the long-fought battle to abolish it. Includes one feature and three shorter segments.

* Life on Southern Plantations-- Examines how a cotton boom produced a dependence on slavery in the South.
* Riding the Underground Railroad-- Travels alongside runaway slaves and meet the people who helped them escape.
* Uncle Tom's Cabin: Politics and the Pen-- Uncovers how Harriet Beecher Stowe foreshadowed the coming Civil War conflict.
* Revolt Aboard the Amistad--Offers insight into the transatlantic slave trade and life aboard slave ships.

$59.95

school media add cart           


African American Lives

An unprecedented four-part series, AFRICAN AMERICAN LIVES uncovers a new level personal discovery. Using genealogy, oral history, family stories, and DNA analysis to trace lineages through American history and back to Africa, the series provides life-changing journeys for a diverse group of highly accomplished African Americans including Whoopi Goldberg, Bishop T.D. Jakes, Quincy Jones, Dr. Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, and Oprah Winfrey.

$24.99

school media add cart


African American Lives 2

The first AFRICAN AMERICAN LIVES revealed the power in discovering one's family history. Now, Henry Louis Gates Jr. will guide a new group to discover their ancestry in AFRICAN AMERICAN LIVES 2. The series will draw on DNA analysis, genealogical research and family oral tradition to trace the lineages of the participants, including Maya Angelou, Morgan Freeman, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, and Tina Turner, down through U.S. history and back to Africa.

$24.99

school media add cart


African Americans, The: Many Rivers to Cross

Explore with Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., the evolution of the African-American people, as well as the multiplicity of cultural institutions, political strategies, and religious and social perspectives they developed — forging their own history, culture and society against unimaginable odds.

$34.99

school media add cart


African Contributions To U.S. History

Discover African-Americans' role in the Civil War. Learn about African-American' great contribution to U.S. education, government, arts, science and more.

$64.95

school media add cart


African Influences On Early Europe

Discover how Africa influenced early Western thinking as well as European medicine & architecture.

$64.95

school media add cart


Against the Odds: The Artists of the Harlem Renaissance

Explore the lives of visual artists who made the Harlem Renaissance one of the 20th century's richest artistic moments. Archival footage, newsreels, and photographs recall the influential force of exhibitions, Harlem's vibrancy in the Roaring Twenties, and significant personalities such as William E. Harmon, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Alain Locke. Watch African-American artists triumph over formidable odds to create lasting beauty.

$24.99

school media add cart


Almos' A Man

Although Dave (LeVar Burton) and his family are poor sharecroppers in the Deep South in the 1930's, this 15 year-olds problem is shared by teenagers today: he stands with one foot in adulthood and the other in childhood. “Almos' A Man”, yet still treated like a child, he struggles for an identity. There's one thing, one symbol of manhood, Dave thinks, that could guarantee him instant respect: a gun.

Dave finds a way to buy a pistol and at last, is ready to pull the trigger for the first time, never again will they call him a boy…But, he trembles, the gun overpowers the boy's body and he loses control - his young life forever changed.

$24.95

school media add cart


Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater: Beyond the Steps

This dazzling cinema verité documentary follows the extraordinary dancers and renowned choreographers of the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater as they do everything it takes to keep American modern dance fresh and a legacy alive.

Award-winning filmmaker Phil Bertelsen offers a rare backstage look at one of America's oldest modern dance companies at a defining moment in its history--as it settles into its own permanent home and training facility in New York City. Set against the construction of the new dance center and the creation of a new dance, every bit of passion, talent, and hard work that goes into keeping a company running is on display. The troupe seamlessly weaves from rehearsal to a triumphant tour in Russia, back to their new dream-come-true digs in Manhattan. BEYOND THE STEPS intertwines the dancers'; individual tragedies and triumphs with breathtaking performance footage from their journey, shining a spotlight on the story of one of America's greatest dance troupes. Visually stunning and emotionally poignant, the film provides a rare glimpse into the fascinating world of modern dance.

$26.95

school media add cart


Amazing Grace

From acclaimed director Michael Apted comes Amazing Grace, a moving historical epic about the life of antislavery pioneer William Wilberforce. Amazing Grace follows Wilberforce?s career through his 20s and 30s, as he and his fellow humanitarians make the issue of slavery a talking point, not only in political circles, but also throughout the country. They wage the first modern political campaign, using petitions, boycotts, mass meetings and even badges with slogans to take their message to the country at large.

$19.98

school media add cart


America Beyond the Color Line with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Henry Louis Gates Jr. travels the length and breadth of the United States to take the temperature of black America at the start of the new century. Gates visits the East Coast, the deep South, inner-city Chicago and Hollywood to explore the rich and diverse landscape, social as well as geographic.

$24.99

school media add cart


Amistad

Djimon Hounsou, Anthony Hopkins and Matthew McConaughey star in Steven Spielberg's powerful dramatization of the 1839 mutiny aboard a slave vessel and the landmark court case that followed. The program chronicles the journey of a group of enslaved Africans who overtake their captor's ship and attempt to return to their beloved homeland. When the ship, La Amistad, is seized, these captives are brought to the United States, where they are charged with murder and await their fate in prison. Based on the historical account Black Mutiny: The Revolt on the Schooner Amistad written by William A. Owens. Morgan Freeman, Nigel Hawthorne, David Paymer, Pete Postlewaite and Anna Paquin also star. Contains violence and nudity.

Rated R

$9.99

school media add cart


At The River I Stand (High School Version)

Memphis, Spring 1968, marked the dramatic climax of the Civil Rights movement. At the River I Stand skillfully reconstructs the two eventful months that transformed a local labor dispute into a national conflagration, and disentangles the complex historical forces that came together with the inevitability of tragedy at the death of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This 58-minute documentary brings into sharp relief issues that have only become more urgent in the intervening years: the connection between economic and civil rights, the debate over violent vs. nonviolent change, and the demand for full inclusion of African Americans in American life.

In the 1960s, Memphis' 1,300 sanitation workers formed the lowest caste of a deeply racist society, earning so little they qualified for welfare. In the film, retired workers recall their fear about taking on the entire white power structure when they struck for higher wages and union recognition.

But local civil rights leaders and the Black community soon realized the strike was part of the struggle for economic justice for all African Americans. Through stirring historical footage we see the community mobilizing behind the strikers, organizing mass demonstrations and an Easter boycott of downtown businesses. The national leadership of AFSCME put the international union's full resources behind the strike. One day, a placard appeared on the picket lines which in its radical simplicity summed up the meaning of the strike: "I am a man."

In March, Martin Luther King, Jr. came to Memphis as part of his Poor People's Campaign to expand the civil rights agenda to the economy. The film recreates the controversies between King's advisors, local leaders, and younger militants - debates that led to open conflict. When young hotheads turned King's protest march into a violent confrontation with the brutal Memphis policy, King left.

King and the nation realized his leadership and nonviolent strategy had been threatened. King felt obliged to return to Memphis to resume a nonviolent march despite the by-now feverish racial tensions. The film captures the deep sense of foreboding that pervaded King's final "I have been to the mountaintop" speech. The next day, April 4, 1968, he was assassinated.

Four days later, thousands from Memphis and around the country rallied to pull off King's nonviolent march. The city council crumbled and granted most of the strikers' demands. Those 1,300 sanitation workers had shown they could successfully challenge the entrenched economic structure of the South.

The 1992 fires of Los Angeles, the endemic inner-city unemployment and the growing disparity between rich and poor, make clear that the issues Martin Luther King, Jr. raised in his last days have yet to be addressed. At the River I Stand succeeds in showing that the causes of (and possibly the solutions to) our present racial quandary may well be found in what happened in Memphis. Its riveting portrait of the grit and determination of ordinary people will inspire viewers to re-dedicate themselves to racial and economic justice.

$69.95

school media add cart


Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, The - 30th Anniversary

Discover the story of the life of a black Louisiana woman, from the time of her childhood as a slave in the pre-Civil War South to 1962, when she witnesses the birth of the civil rights movement at the age of 110. Based on the book by Ernest J. Gaines and starring Cecily Tyson and Barbara Chaney, this program received nine Emmy Awards, including Best Director and Best Actress.

$9.95

school media add cart


Black Americans of Achievement DVD Collection, The

This outstanding collection of video biographies celebrates the most influential African Americans in history. Based on Chelsea House Publishers' critically acclaimed book series that draws from the expertise of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for Afro-American research at Harvard University, each volume reviews the individual's message and significance in society today. Oral historian John O'Neal hosts each program that features lively interviews with leading authorities on the subject's life, accompanied by fascinating archival footage, photographs and period music that illuminate the inspirational and motivational factors in each individual's life.

$119.85

school media add cart


Black History: Lost, Stolen or Strayed

Did you know that the first open-heart surgery was performed by a black doctor, Daniel Hale Williams? Not many people did in 1968, the year this eye-opening film, narrated by Bill Cosby, was first released. Many still don't today. "Black History: Lost, Stolen or Strayed" reviews the numerous contributions of African-Americans to the development of the United States. From the perspective of the turbulent late 1960s, the fact that their positive roles had not generally been taught as part of American history, coupled with the pervasiveness of derogatory stereotypes, was evidence of how black people had long been victims of negative attitudes and ignorance. Viewing this film today offers students and adults an opportunity to explore their own perspectives -- to examine how things have changed in their lives and those of their parents, as well as how troubling stereotypes still persist four decades later.

$59.99

school media add cart           


Charles Drew: Revolutionized Medical Science

CHARLES DREW born 1904, was an African American physician and medical researcher who revolutionized the field of medicine with developments in blood-work. Growing up in Washington, D.C., Drew excelled in everything he approached but his life and career ambitions always faced an upward battle due to the color of his skin. His research on plasma and transfusions in the 1930's led to discoveries relating to the separation and preservation of blood and the establishment of the world famous American Red Cross. Drew was the first doctor to work for the ARC and oversaw the first blood drive, "Blood for Britain", which supplied blood plasma to the British fighting in World War II, saving thousands of allied lives. He protested against the prevalent practice of racial segregation in the donation of blood from donors of different races on the basis that it lacked scientific foundation. Charles Drew set a standard of excellence unparalleled by most of his white contemporaries. In 1943, his distinction in his profession was recognized when he became the first Black surgeon to serve as an examiner on the American Board of Surgery. Despite the prejudices of American society in the first half of the 20th century, Charles Drew persevered in his practice and was never afraid to stand up for his beliefs and racial equality.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Chester Himes: A Rage in Harlem, Internationally Acclaimed Writer

CHESTER HIMES born 1909 in Jefferson, Missouri into a middle class academic black family was an internationally acclaimed African American writer who created a violent and cynical picture of the black experience in America by writing about his encounters with racism. This program is a moving portrait of a man who used his literary talents to vent his rage against an unjust society. In 1928 when Chester Himes was nineteen, he was chained upside down, beaten by police until he confessed to an armed robbery, sentenced for 20 to 25 years, and incarcerated in the Ohio State Penitentiary. By the time he was paroled in 1936, he had become a nationally known writer publishing stories in the African-American periodicals and Esquire. His novels, short stories and screenplays were mostly about black protagonists doomed by white racism and hate. By the 1950's Himes had decided to settle in France permanently, a country he liked in part due to his critical popularity there. Living among other expatriate writers that included James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison and Richard Wright, he published a series of black detective novels set in Harlem in the '50's and '60's that established Chester Himes' international reputation as an author and literary equal of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Chisholm '72: Unbought and Unbossed

CHISHOLM '72 Unbought & Unbossed is the first historical documentary on Brooklyn Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm and her campaign to become the Democratic Party's presidential nominee in 1972. Following Chisholm from the announcement of her candidacy in January to the Democratic National Convention in Miami, Florida in July, the story is like her- fabulous, fierce, and fundamentally "right on."

Chisholm's fight is for inclusion, as she writes in her book The Good Fight (1973), and encompasses all Americans "who agree that the institutions of this country belong to all of the people who inhabit it." Shunned by the political establishment, Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm asks people of color, feminists and young voters for their support to "reshape our society and take control of our destiny as we go down the Chisholm Trail in 1972." To the surprise of many, voters responded.

$9.98

school media add cart


Civil Rights Movement, The

A powerful portrayal of the great 20th century struggle for freedom, dignity and equality.
$109.00

school media add cart


Color of Friendship

In 1977, the family of African-American congressman Ron Dellums hosts a South African exchange student, prompting two teenagers--one black, one white--to confront personal biases and institutional racism. Inspired by actual events, this feature-length drama explores issues of prejudice, race relations, civil rights, and apartheid.

$19.99

school media add cart


Color Purple, The (Special Edition)

A black Southern woman finds her self after 40 years, beginning in 1909. Directed by Steven Spielberg. From the Alice Walker novel.

Actors: Whoopi Goldberg , Danny Glover , Margaret Avery , Oprah Winfrey , Willard Pugh , Adolph Caesar

$26.99

school media add cart


Dr. Daniel Hale Williams: First Black Heart Surgeon in America

DANIEL HALE WILLIAMS was an African-American cardiologist that performed the first successful open heart surgery. He also founded Provident Hospital, the first non-segregated hospital in the U.S. Dr. Williams was an extraordinary man of incredible talent and merit and his exceptional accomplishments are documented with great care in this inspiring program. Born to 'freed people of color' in 1856, he attended medical school at what is now Northwestern University in Chicago to become a practicing surgeon. His observations that American Blacks were treated as second-class citizens within the medical community, both professionally and as patients, motivated him to establish and run the first hospital for Blacks in the United States; Provident Hospital. Williams set up the first nursing school for Blacks and performed one of the first open heart surgeries in the world. His encounters with institutionalized racism gave him the courage and determination to create more hospitals and educational programs like the one he had at Provident. In 1885 he co-founded the National Medical Association for Black Doctors and openly encouraged African Americans to support hospitals that would offer first-rate care to African-Americans. In 1913, he became a charter member and only African American in the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Daniel Hale Williams' notable achievements as a Cardiac Surgeon helped to revolutionize the field of medicine and humanize its practices.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Ernest Green Story

Show students what conditions were like for the Little Rock Nine, a group of courageous black students who enrolled in an all-white Arkansas high school. As a senior, Ernest Green withstood harassment and restrictive conditions for a chance to get a better education and uphold our Constitution. Includes an 8-page Teacher's Guide.

$19.99

school media add cart           


Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement

Eyes on the Prize tells the definitive story of the Civil Rights era from the point of view of the ordinary men and women whose extraordinary actions launched a movement that changed the fabric of American life, and embodied a struggle whose reverberations continue to be felt today.

$375.00

school media add cart


Faith Ringgold: The Last Story Quilt

Share an insider's look at how one African-American woman, through patience, perseverance and education fulfilled her dream of becoming an artist. Every obstacle she faced reinforced her determination to reach her goal. A painter by profession, she has moved away from traditional framed canvases to tankas, paintings on quilted canvas with frames of quilted fabric.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Famous Activists: Paul Robeson and Richard Wright

FAMOUS ACTIVISTS: PAUL ROBESON & RICHARD WRIGHT

PAUL ROBESON was a celebrated African-American Actor, Athlete, Singer, Writer, and Civil Rights Activist. Robesons many achievements are chronicled in this program, ranging from playing with the NFL to graduating from Columbia Law School, performing on Broadway and in Hollywood films to founding the American Crusade against Lynching as well as Council on African Affairs. Robeson was one of the most talented performers of his time and a dedicated humanitarian who ultimately sacrificed fame and fortune for what he believed in. His association with Leftist Politics during the era of the Cold War, and frequent denouncing of American political parties led to his eventual blacklisting with other prominent writers and artists during the McCarthy Era. His talents in all areas are remarkable, and his dedication to attaining a peaceful coexistence between all the people of the world is truly admirable.

RICHARD WRIGHT was an African-American author of novels, short stories and non-fiction that dealt with powerful themes and controversial topics. Much of his works concerned racial themes that helped redefine discussions of race relations in America in the mid-20th century. Born on a plantation in Mississippi, Wright was a descendent of the first slaves who arrived in Jamestown Massachusetts. This program follows his arduous path from sharecropper to literary giant. Through authors like H.L. Menken, Sinclair Lewis, Theodore Dreiser, he discovered that literature could be used as a catalyst for social change. In 1937 Wright moved to New York and his work began to garner national attention for its political and social commentary. Much of Wrights writing focused on the African American community and experience; his novel Native Son won him a Guggenheim Fellowship and was adapted to the Broadway stage with Orson Welles directing in 1941. In 1946, Wright was fed up with Americas treatment of its black citizen and became an expatriate in Paris, France where he joined a circle that included famous Existentialists Jean-Paul Sarte and Albert Camus. Though he quit his formal education at only 15 years old, Richard Wright was a major influence on world literature & politics, and brought the black experience to the forefront of social discourse.

Bonus Material: Each program includes 24 minutes of Bonus material.

$64.95

school media add cart


Famous Human Rights Crusaders: Ida B. Wells and Fannie Lou Hammer

FAMOUS HUMAN RIGHTS CRUSADERS: IDA B. WELLS & FANNIE LOU HAMMER.

IDA B WELLS walked the long road from slavery to freedom and equality. Born 1862 in Holly Springs, Mississippi to parents who were former slaves, she rose to challenge and strongly condemn American lynching in the South. Her work as teacher, journalist and human rights activist brought worldwide attention to this brutality. She was a community organizer and grass roots leader who was a precursor of the modern Civil Rights movement. Her inspiring story takes us from Memphis, to Chicago, Washington D.C. and England. From penning editorials and publishing the first expose on the horrors of lynching, The Red Record, to touring America and Europe as a speaker and protestor, Ida B. Wells was a true crusader in the fight to preserve human rights. Her relentless public battle against the injustices of lynching won her more enemies than friends in her time, but she is remembered today as a strong woman, tireless crusader and a true American hero.

FANNIE LOU HAMER born in 1917 in Montgomery County, Mississippi was the granddaughter of a slave and the youngest of 20 children. Raised by hardworking parents who were sharecroppers, she was no stranger to poverty or hardship. An inspirational speaker and writer, she used her powerful voice to raise the cause of equality and freedom for all blacks in America and became a defining force in the fight against social injustice during the early years of the civil rights movement. In this rare documentary, her struggles and triumphs are expressed through Hamers own words as well as those of friends and colleagues. While attending the 1964 Democratic National Convention, Fannie Lou Hamer posed the defining question: "Is this America? The land of the free and the home of the brave? Where we have to sleep with our telephone off the hook, because our lives be threatened daily because we want to live in peace as human beings in America?" She will be remembered for winning the right to vote for Black Americans and exposing Americas poverty by giving a voice to those in need. This program is an inspiration to anyone who has ever faced oppression and acts as a powerful reminder of what one individual is capable of achieving in the face of adversity.

Bonus Material: Each program includes 24 minutes of Bonus material.

$64.95

school media add cart


Famous Men Of Medical Science: Dr. Daniel Hale Williams and Charles Drew

FAMOUS MEN OF MEDICAL SCIENCE: DR. DANIEL HALE WILLIAMS & CHARLES DREW

DANIEL HALE WILLIAMS was an African-American cardiologist that performed the first successful open heart surgery. He also founded Provident Hospital, the first non-segregated hospital in the U.S. Dr. Williams was an extraordinary man of incredible talent and merit and his exceptional accomplishments are documented with great care in this inspiring program. Born to freed people of color in 1856, he attended medical school at what is now Northwestern University in Chicago to become a practicing surgeon. His observations that American Blacks were treated as second-class citizens within the medical community, both professionally and as patients, motivated him to establish and run the first hospital for Blacks in the United States; Provident Hospital. Williams set up the first nursing school for Blacks and performed one of the first open heart surgeries in the world. His encounters with institutionalized racism gave him the courage and determination to create more hospitals and educational programs like the one he had at Provident. In 1885 he co-founded the National Medical Association for Black Doctors and openly encouraged African Americans to support hospitals that would offer first-rate care to African-Americans. In 1913, he became a charter member and only African American in the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Daniel Hale Williams notable achievements as a Cardiac Surgeon helped to revolutionize the field of medicine and humanize its practices.

CHARLES DREW born 1904, was an African American physician and medical researcher who revolutionized the field of medicine with developments in blood-work. Growing up in Washington, D.C., Drew excelled in everything he approached but his life and career ambitions always faced an upward battle due to the color of his skin. His research on plasma and transfusions in the 1930s led to discoveries relating to the separation and preservation of blood and the establishment of the world famous American Red Cross. Drew was the first doctor to work for the ARC and oversaw the first blood drive, "Blood for Britain", which supplied blood plasma to the British fighting in World War II, saving thousands of allied lives. He protested against the prevalent practice of racial segregation in the donation of blood from donors of different races on the basis that it lacked scientific foundation. Charles Drew set a standard of excellence unparalleled by most of his white contemporaries. In 1943, his distinction in his profession was recognized when he became the first Black surgeon to serve as an examiner on the American Board of Surgery. Despite the prejudices of American society in the first half of the 20th century, Charles Drew persevered in his practice and was never afraid to stand up for his beliefs and racial equality.

Bonus Material: Each program includes 24 minutes of Bonus material.

$64.95

school media add cart


Famous Public Figures: Mary Mcleod Bethune and Shirley Chisholm

FAMOUS PUBLIC FIGURES: MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE & SHIRLEY CHISHOLM

MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE (1875-1955) was born the 15th of 17 children to former slaves in South Carolina. This inspiring program follows her illustrious path from the cotton fields of the South to renowned African American educator, leader of women, distinguished adviser to several American presidents including Franklin D. Roosevelt, close friend of Eleanor Roosevelt and champion of racial equality. Her many achievements are a testament to the power of education and its importance in the African American community. Mary McLeod Bethune understood the importance of education for all people. In an era when most African American children received little or no education, she established a school for African American girls. In 1904, she rented a two-story frame building in Daytona Beach, Fla., and opened her school with only $1.50, six pupils, used crates for desks and crushed elderberries for ink. Through determination and dedication, she built this tiny school into United Methodist Church affiliated Bethune-Cookman University. During her long career Bethune received many honorary degrees and awards, including the Haitian Medal of Honor and Merit (1949), the highest award of the Haitian government. Mary McLeod Bethune set a standard of excellence for the education of African Americans and she achieved her dreams through her own determination and strong faith in herself.

SHIRLEY CHISHOLM born 1924 in Brooklyn, N.Y. is the first Black woman elected to the U.S. Congress and the first to campaign for the presidency. She was an outspoken advocate for women and minorities during the seven terms she served in the House. Her legacy of political and social activism laid the foundation for the rise of women and Blacks in American politics. "Of my two "handicaps" being female put more obstacles in my path than being black." This program is a celebration of her life and a political diary from the 1960s through the 1970s during an era of political transition and social change. The range of Chisholms activism is explored in depth through her involvement in civil rights, womens rights, and the anti-Vietnam War efforts. We witness the excitement firsthand of Chisholm announcing her candidacy for President with the Democratic Party in 1972, declaring she is not a representative solely of the black or female communities, but "a candidate of the people". Though she did not win the nomination that year, she remained active in politics and served the House of Representatives until her retirement in 1982. In this inspiring program, Shirley Chisholm em erges as a charismatic leader and social reformer that achieved positive change in American politics and society for future generations.

Bonus Material: Each program includes 24 minutes of Bonus material.

$64.95

school media add cart


Famous Writers: Chester Himes and Ralph Ellison

FAMOUS WRITERS: CHESTER HIMES & RALPH ELLISON

CHESTER HIMES born 1909 in Jefferson, Missouri into a middle class academic black family was an internationally acclaimed African American writer who created a violent and cynical picture of the black experience in America by writing about his encounters with racism. This program is a moving portrait of a man who used his literary talents to vent his rage against an unjust society. In 1928 when Chester Himes was nineteen, he was chained upside down, beaten by police until he confessed to an armed robbery, sentenced for 20 to 25 years, and incarcerated in the Ohio State Penitentiary. By the time he was paroled in 1936, he had become a nationally known writer publishing stories in the African-American periodicals and Esquire. His novels, short stories and screenplays were mostly about black protagonists doomed by white racism and hate. By the 1950s Himes had decided to settle in France permanently, a country he liked in part due to his critical popularity there. Living among other expatriate writers that included James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison and Richard Wright, he published a series of black detective novels set in Harlem in the 50s and 60s that established Chester Himes international reputation as an author and literary equal of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler.

RALPH ELLISON was an African-American writer and essayist, whos only novel INVISIBLE MAN (1953) gained a wide critical success. Ellisons ambitious journey from a childhood of hardship and poverty to celebrated African American writer is chronicled in this inspiring program through exclusive interviews and personal recollection. Invisible Man (1952) addresses issues pertinent to Black society and identity in the 1950s by using the protagonists desire and determination to be visible as a metaphor for the entire African American communitys struggle to be recognized in a world of prejudice and hostility. He remarked that "Literature is Colorblind", using racial issues as a means to express the universal dilemmas of identity and self-discovery. Despite the social and political boundaries in place during the 1950s for a black man with no formal education, Ellison has been compared to such writers as Melville and Hawthorne. Talented in many fields, Ellison also was an accomplished jazz trumpeter and a free-lance photographer. Ellison lectured widely at various American colleges and universities, including Columbia, Yale, Chicago, and New York University. Among Ellisons several awards are the Medal of Freedom (1969), Chevalier de lOrdre des Artes et Lettres (1970) and 1985 National Medal of Arts.

Bonus Material: Each program includes 24 minutes of Bonus material.

$64.95

school media add cart


Fannie Lou Hamer: Voting Rights Activist and Civil Rights Leader

FANNIE LOU HAMER born in 1917 in Montgomery County, Mississippi was the granddaughter of a slave and the youngest of 20 children. Raised by hardworking parents who were sharecroppers, she was no stranger to poverty or hardship. An inspirational speaker and writer, she used her powerful voice to raise the cause of equality and freedom for all blacks in America and became a defining force in the fight against social injustice during the early years of the civil rights movement. In this rare documentary, her struggles and triumphs are expressed through Hamer's own words as well as those of friends and colleagues. While attending the 1964 Democratic National Convention, Fannie Lou Hamer posed the defining question: "Is this America? The land of the free and the home of the brave? Where we have to sleep with our telephone off the hook, because our lives be threatened daily because we want to live in peace as human beings in America?" She will be remembered for winning the right to vote for Black Americans and exposing America's poverty by giving a voice to those in need. This program is an inspiration to anyone who has ever faced oppression and acts as a powerful reminder of what one individual is capable of achieving in the face of adversity.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Finding Oprah's Roots: Finding Your Own

Finding Oprah's Roots, a companion to the book by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., features Oprah, showing by her example, that it is possible to build an African American family tree. Excerpts from the Oprah's Roots documentary are combined with comments from many of the experts featured in the film including genealogist Tony Burroughs and historian John Thornton.

$24.99

school media add cart


First Person Singular: John Hope Franklin

Track the career of octogenarian John Hope Franklin, the historian who rewrote U.S. history. His major work, FROM SLAVERY TO FREEDOM, forever changed historians' perceptions of the African-American role in building America. Franklin describes the difficulties of growing up black in America: slights, strife, opportunities denied. Yet against a grim backdrop, his indomitable spirit shines through, in an uplifting tale of triumph over adversity.

$24.99

school media add cart


Flyers in Search of a Dream

Most Americans are familiar with Orville and Wilbur Wright, Charles Lindbergh, and Amelia Earhart, but few know the stories of America's pioneering black aviators, who overcame social pressures to gain the right to fly. FLYERS IN SEARCH OF A DREAM documents the lives and adventures of early black aviators, from Bessie Coleman, first black to earn an aviator license, to James Herman Banning, first black to complete a transcontinental flight.

$24.99

school media add cart


Frederick Douglass

As a young man, he experienced the brutality of slavery firsthand. As an outspoken leader of the abolitionist movement, he became one of the most powerful voices in American history.

Frederick Douglass inadvertently found his calling while giving an impromptu speech at an antislavery meeting in 1841. As a former slave, he quickly became not only a persuasive speaker, but also a poignant symbol of freedom. His insightful and eloquent lectures and his tireless efforts to educate the public about the realities of slavery significantly furthered the abolitionist cause. This inspiring BIOGRAPHY program chronicles Douglass's remarkable life: from his childhood in slavery to his crucial work on behalf of former slaves following the Civil War.

Rare photographs and extensive interviews with leading historians offer a revealing portrait of this extraordinary man.

DVD Features: Interactive Menus; Scene Selection

$24.95

school media add cart


FRONTLINE: Dreams of Obama

As Barack Obama assumes the presidency on January 20th, 2009, FRONTLINE tells the story of how a little known state senator rose from obscurity to the White House in just over four years. Dreams of Obama draws on interviews with those closest to Obama to provide insight into how he might lead the country. A personal and political biography, the film examines the key moments that shaped Obama, and asks what his election says about America.

$24.99

school media add cart


Go Tell It on the Mountain

A story of violence and desire, of tenderness and compassion, so gripping and moving, which lays bare the trials and sufferings, the yearnings and aspirations of three generations of an African American family. The journey of a family from the rural South to "big city" Harlem seeking both salvation and understanding and of a young boy struggling to earn the approval of a self-righteous and often unloving stepfather.

The voice of one of America's most celebrated authors, James Baldwin, comes the acclaimed motion picture adaptation of one of the most important novels of our time. This film, so praised by the critics, stars actors Paul Winfield, Alfre Woodard, Ruby Dee, and Olivia Cole who, among the breadth of their many accolades, share two Academy Award, twenty-five EMMY and three Golden Globe Award nominations.

To be black in America. To seek both salvation and understanding in the journey of a family from the rural South to "big city" Harlem. From the celebrated James Baldwin novel.

$19.95

school media add cart


Gospel

Never before has a film so enthusiastically captured the mood and spirit of this unique American art form. Five of the legends of Gospel music live in a concert extravaganza at the Paramount Theatre in Oakland, CA.

$19.95

school media add cart


Great African American Authors

One of the amazing American sagas is the history of African-American Literature. It is a history of a literature that rose out of slavery, oppression and racism to become one of the great literary traditions in the world. Great African American Authors, an eight part series, brings to light the accomplishments of over 40 brilliant black writers, who against all odds wrote great novels, plays and poetry. These authors include Phillis Wheatley, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison, August Wilson, Rita Dove and many more. Their story is the story of America, the story that all Americans should know.

$199.99

school media add cart           


Harlem Globetrotters, The

For over 75 years, the Harlem Globetrotters have brought laughter and delight to millions with their ball-handling wizardry and wacky stunts. Yet the team has a surprisingly serious history-in fact, they were instrumental in breaking down racial barriers and establishing the fledgling NBA.

Join BIOGRAPHY for a comprehensive history of the "Clown Princes of Basketball," tracing the club's evolution from its earliest days as Chicago's "Savoy Big Five" through rare archival footage and interviews with players and experts, including Jerry Saperstein, founder Abe Saperstein's son, and Bill Cosby. Learn about the ongoing conflict between players and coach; follow the careers of some of the most famous Trotters, including Meadowlark Lemon; and witness their early games and 'round-the-globe touring.

This is the definitive portrait of THE HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS, the charismatic team that jump-started professional basketball and changed the face of America.

DVD Features: Interactive Menus; Scene Selection

$24.95

school media add cart


Harlem Globetrotters: Team That Changed The World

Relive the greatest moments of the Harlem Globetrotters with this documentary that chronicles the team's legendary 1948 defeat over the Minneapolis Lakers and their historic 1951 Berlin trip. Narrated by rapper Chuck D. the program features vintage footage and interviews with former Globetrotters, NBA coaches and others. Extras include a featurette about the team's 1950 world tour, another on the amazing "Tricks of the Trotters" and much more.

$19.98

school media add cart


Harlem Renaissance

Featuring commentary from historians and performers, this program traces the roots of the music of the, its social impact on society and its eventual acceptance in mainstream culture.

$19.95

school media add cart


Heroes of Freedom: The Stories of Harriet Tubman and Rosa Parks

Children will learn about the lives of these influential women in American history in this live-action program, featuring dramatic re-enactments and photographs, along with colorful maps and graphics. The program travels back in time to a southern plantation in 1830 to illustrate the realities of Harriet Tubman's life as an enslaved person. Viewers will also explore her role in the Underground Railroad and the events leading to the end of slavery in America. The program then looks at the life of Rosa Parks in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1955, highlighting her experiences in dealing with segregation. Students will learn about Parks' role in the Civil Rights Movement -- specifically, how her act of defiance changed history. The program includes a teacher's guide.

$39.95

school media add cart           


History of Black Achievement in America, A

This original, eight-part series documents Black Achievement in American history, its defining role in the growth of the country, and its influence on current events. Presented by James Avery, the series highlights the many contributions of Black Americans that have influenced our culture, enriched our society with their achievements, and shaped the history of the United States.

It's one of the least known stories in American history. It is the story of black achievement and accomplishment. Against all odds, American blacks have built their own institutions: families, schools, churches and businesses. Against all odds, American blacks have created great art and science... Fought heroically in every American war. Against all odds, black men and women have worked endlessly to secure their own freedom and equality. The untold Story of blacks in America is a 350-year saga of incredible achievements. This is that story.

$79.99

school media add cart           


History of Civil Rights in America, A

A History of Civil Rights in America offers a comprehensive historical overview detailing the expansion of civil rights to include more people. The series takes you through the development of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the 13th Amendment and 14th Amendments, civil rights legislation , court decisions as well as examining fearless civil rights leaders like Rosa Parks, Cesar Chavez, Thurgood Marshall, and Martin Luther King, Jr. From the past to the present, , this eight part series takes the viewer through one of the most powerful forces in American History; the promise of equality for all.

Hosted by Tim Johnson.

$199.99

school media add cart           


Hoop Dreams

Two ordinary inner-city kids dare to dream the impossible - professional basketball glory - in this epic chronicle of hope and faith. Filmed over a five-year period, Hoop Dreams follows young Arthur Agee and William Gates as they navigate the complex, competitive world of scholastic athletics while striving to overcome the intense pressures of family life and the realities of their Chicago streets. The Criterion Collection is proud to present this landmark documentary chronicling two remarkable families who challenge the American dream.

Rated PG-13

$29.95

school media add cart


Ida B. Wells: Crusader For Human Rights

IDA B WELLS walked the long road from slavery to freedom and equality. Born 1862 in Holly Springs, Mississippi to parents who were former slaves, she rose to challenge and strongly condemned American lynching in the South. Her work as teacher, journalist and human rights activist brought worldwide attention to this brutality. She was a community organizer and grass roots leader who was a precursor of the modern Civil Rights movement. Her inspiring story takes us from Memphis, to Chicago, Washington D.C. and England. From penning editorials and publishing the first expose on the horrors of lynching, The Red Record, to touring America and Europe as a speaker and protestor, Ida B. Wells was a true crusader in the fight to preserve human rights. Her relentless public battle against the injustices of lynching won her more enemies than friends in her time, but she is remembered today as a strong woman, tireless crusader and a true American hero.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Jazz

JAZZ celebrates America's greatest original art form. Ken Burns' 10-part documentary opens at the dawn of the 20th century, incorporating American culture and historical events that interact directly with the music. From the 1890s through the ferment of the Harlem Renaissance and the Jazz Age, to the Great Depression, New Deal, Second World War, and beyond, JAZZ paints an astounding portrait of a nation and its improvisational core of music.

$99.99

school media add cart


King

Nominated for nine Emmy Awards, this "astute and compelling" (Variety) biographybased on the remarkable life of Nobel Peace Prize winner Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., takes an intimate look at one of the world's most public heroes during one of the most tumultuous times in American history. Starring Paul Winfield, Cicely Tyson and Ossie Davis, King is a riveting tale that appropriately honors a true legend.In 1950s/60s America, the civil rights movement found its leader in a Southern Baptist minister. Using lyrical eloquence, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., motivated masses of peopleblack and whiteto demand equality by way of nonviolent protest. But in spite of his peaceful agenda, Dr. King was often the target of terrible violence. He was never swayedfrom his path, however; for by the time he was assassinated in 1968, Dr. King had already defined adream that would change a nation forever.

Actors: Paul Winfield , Cicely Tyson , Tony Bennett , Roscoe Browne , Ossie Davis , Lonny Chapman , Cliff Young , Howard Rollins , William Jordan

$19.98

school media add cart


Langston Hughes: Poet, Social Activist, Novelist, Playwright and Literary Giant

An American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist, Langston Hughes was first recognized as an important literary figure during the 1920s, a period known as the "Harlem Renaissance," a cultural movement made famous because of the number of emerging black writers, poets and scholars. Hughes, more than any other black poet or writer, recorded faithfully the nuances of black life and its frustrations and was one of the earliest innovators of the then-new literary art form called jazz poetry. Embracing the common experience of black Americans, he was the bard of his people because he felt their joys and suffering himself. Hughes lived in several US cities, then traveled abroad extensively, first as a seaman, later as a war correspondent. Renowned for his folksy humor, his work was well received by a black audience who saw themselves in his characters. In 1934 Hughes first short story collection The Ways of White Folks, was published. It looked at the humorous and tragic interactions between races, but was tinged with pessimism. He went on to write countless works of poetry, prose and plays and had a popular column for the Chicago Defender. Hughes was a literary giant, always faithful to his belief that "most people are generally good, in every race and in every country where I have been." In 1960, the NAACP awarded Hughes the Spingarn Medal for distinguished achievement by a black American, calling him the "poet laureate of the Negro race."

$64.95

school media add cart


Leaving Cleaver: Henry Louis Gates Jr. Remembers Eldridge Cleaver

In March 1997, social activist, former Black Panther, and author, Eldridge Cleaver sat down with Henry Louis Gates Jr. for a discussion of his life as a civil rights activist. It would be the last major interview Cleaver gave before his death in May 1998. This film draws on the 1997 interview, archival footage, and commentary from Cleaver’s former wife Kathleen, as well as audio tapes of a 1975 interview that Gates did with Cleaver in Paris.

$24.99

school media add cart


Lesson Before Dying, A

Based on the novel by Ernest J. Gaines, this powerful feature is set in the south during the 1940s, when racism was as widespread in the legal system as in the rest of society. A poorly educated young man is convicted of a murder he did not commit and sentenced to death. His losing, white defense attorney put up an argument that the boy was as dumb as an animal and therefore not responsible. It is left to a proud, black schoolteacher to give the boy back his pride and dignity before the state takes his life. With Cicely Tyson, Mekhi Phifer and Irma P. Hall. Made for television. Nominated for seven Emmy Awards.

$9.98

school media add cart


Martin Luther King, Jr. : Been To The Mountaintop

Seen and heard in this original footage are the highlights of dramatic speeches and coversations spanning 1956 to 1968, including his last address on April 3, 1968, the night before his assassination in Memphis, Tennessee.

$19.99

school media add cart


Martin Luther King, Jr.: I Have a Dream

This program presents highlights from civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr.'s major speeches, with original footage of the historic events. The program includes excerpts from King's speeches at the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963; Selma, Alabama, on March 8, 1965; and his final speech before his assassination on April 3, 1968. Also includes excerpts from Robert Kennedy's eulogy on April 4, 1968.

$19.98

school media add cart


Martin Scorsese Presents: The Blues

This PBS series, executive produced by Martin Scorsese, consists of seven feature-length films that capture the essence of the blues while exploring how this art form so deeply influenced music and people the world over. The films include such treasures as rare video footage, interviews and unforgettable performances by some of the greatest musicians in blues history.

$139.98

school media add cart


Mary Mcleod Bethune: Champion For Education

MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE (1875-1955) was born the 15th of 17 children to former slaves in South Carolina. This inspiring program follows her illustrious path from the cotton fields of the South to renowned African American educator, leader of women, distinguished adviser to several American presidents including Franklin D. Roosevelt, close friend of Eleanor Roosevelt and champion of racial equality. Her many achievements are a testament to the power of education and its importance in the African American community. Mary McLeod Bethune understood the importance of education for all people. In an era when most African American children received little or no education, she established a school for African American girls. In 1904, she rented a two-story frame building in Daytona Beach, Fla., and opened her school with only $1.50, six pupils, used crates for desks and crushed elderberries for ink. Through determination and dedication, she built this tiny school into United Methodist Church affiliated Bethune-Cookman University. During her long career Bethune received many honorary degrees and awards, including the Haitian Medal of Honor and Merit (1949), the highest award of the Haitian government. Mary McLeod Bethune set a standard of excellence for the education of African Americans and she achieved her dreams through her own determination and strong faith in herself.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Massachusetts 54th Colored Infantry, The

Two years into the Civil War, free men of color were still denied the right to fight for the end of slavery. Weeks after Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, the governor of Massachusetts was authorized to raise the first northern black regiment, referred to at the time as "the Massachusetts 54th colored infantry."

Almost 100 men from Massachusetts' small black population joined the regiment while the rest of the 1,000 men were recruited from nearby states. They came from all walks of life—they were shopkeepers, farmers, musicians, blacksmiths, doctors, and lawyers. Intelligent and educated, they left their lives behind to join the battle against slavery.

The Regiment fought bravely for nearly two years before the company marched to take Charleston. In the fall of 1865, a victorious 54th Infantry returned to Boston, one portion of the 178,975 black men who fought in the war.

American Experience follows the adventures of the 54th as well as those of individual members, including Lewis and Charles Douglass, sons of abolitionist Frederick Douglass; Luis Emilio, who chronicled the regiment's movements; and James Gooding, whose letters were published as a column in his hometown newspaper.

$19.95

school media add cart


Miss Evers' Boys

Laurence Fishburne stars in this Emmy-winning HBO drama about the Tuskegee Experiment, a government program that withheld penicillin from some African American men infected with syphilis so that scientists could study the effects of the disease. One nurse, Eunice Evers (Alfre Woodard), comforted the afflicted men during the decades-long experiment, which ended only when public outcry in the 1970s forced the government to abandon the project.

Actors: Alfre Woodard , Laurence Fishburne , Craig Sheffer , Joe Morton , Obba Babatunde , E.G. Marshall , Ossie Davis

$9.98

school media add cart


Only the Ball Was White

Throughout the 1900's, before Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier in 1946, black baseball talent blossomed in the Negro Leagues. Baseball buffs still sing the praises of Josh Gibson who could be counted on to hit 70 homeruns in a season, and Satchel Paige who pitched over 100 no-hitters in his career.

Only the Ball Was White pays tribute to the many topflight players from the Negro Leagues. Narrated by actor Paul Winfield, the program documents a bygone bittersweet era in baseball and the men who were denied stardom by the color line.

Ballplayers throughout the country were interviewed for this program, all of them quick to tell tales of the life, the competition, and the camaraderie. These include: Satchel Paige, Roy Campanella, Buck Leonard, Jimmy Crutchfield, David Malarcher, Effa Manley, and Quincy Trouppe.

$9.98

school media add cart


Paul Robeson: 20th Century Renaissance Man, Entertainer and Activist

PAUL ROBESON was a celebrated African-American Actor, Athlete, Singer, Writer, and Civil Rights Activist. Robeson's many achievements are chronicled in this program, ranging from playing with the NFL to graduating from Columbia Law School, performing on Broadway and in Hollywood films to founding the American Crusade against Lynching as well as Council on African Affairs. Robeson was one of the most talented performers of his time and a dedicated humanitarian who ultimately sacrificed fame and fortune for what he believed in. His association with Leftist Politics during the era of the Cold War, and frequent denouncing of American political parties led to his eventual blacklisting with other prominent writers and artists during the McCarthy Era. His talents in all areas are remarkable, and his dedication to attaining a peaceful coexistence between all the people of the world is truly admirable.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Paul Robeson: Speak Of Me As I Am

Speak Of Me As I Am tells the story of one of America's foremost African-American citizens, whose courageous stance against oppression and inequality was a forerunner to the civil rights movement of the 1960s. It examines his remarkable life and achievements as a scholar, athlete, artist, social activist and humanitarian. His passion for the stage and screen was matched by his dedication to social justice. This film weaves together archive footage of Robeson and interviews with commentators including biographer, Martin Duberman.

$19.99

school media add cart


Percy Julian - Forgotten Genius

His house was firebombed. He lost his job on the eve of the Depression. He took on powerful, entrenched interests in the scientific establishment and overcame countless obstacles to become a world-class chemist, a self-made millionaire, and a humanitarian. Yet despite his achievements, Percy Julian's story is largely unknown.

The grandson of Alabama slaves, Julian broke the color barrier in American science more than a decade before Jackie Robinson did in baseball. A brilliant innovator, he discovered a way to turn soybeans into synthetic steroids on an industrial scale, helping to make drugs like cortisone available to millions.

In Forgotten Genius, a special two-hour presentation starring Tony-award winning actor Ruben Santiago-Hudson, NOVA brings Julian's scientific breakthroughs and gripping biography to life, with vivid period reenactments based on newly opened family archives and interviews with dozens of colleagues and relatives.

Special DVD features include: materials and activities for educators; a link to the NOVA Web site; scene selections; closed captions; and described video for the visually impaired.

$23.25

school media add cart


President Barack Obama: The Man and His Journey

President Barack Obama: The Man and His Journey – It's been a long time coming, but in this defining moment, Barack Obama through his election as President of the United States, has brought change to America. Share this special journey and understand one man's meteoric rise to our nation's highest office. The DVD features exclusive election night footage from Chicago where Barack Obama accepted the nomination to be President of the United States.

This truly compelling American story of hope and determination is narrated by 4-time NAACP Image Award winning and Golden Globe nominated actor Blair Underwood, and features exclusive interviews with Martin Luther King III, George Lopez, Hill Harper, Roland Martin, Linda Johnson Rice, Congressman Jesse Jackson as well as other prominent national personalities in the fields of Politics, Entertainment, Religion, Business and Academia. This feature film explores the post-election, what was truly at stake, and the monumental significance of this moment in our nation's history.

'Journey' also features a previously unreleased original song composed and performed by multi-talented Grammy nominated recording artist Brian McKnight. The song, fittingly titled "Yes We Can!" was inspired by President Elect Obama's historic victory.

$19.99

school media add cart


Prince Among Slaves

In 1788, the slave ship Africa set sail towards America, with precious cargo: hundreds of men, women, and children. Eight months later, a handful of survivors were for sale in Mississippi. One of them, 26-year-old Abdul Rahman, made an amazing claim: he was a prince of an African kingdom. Prince Among Slaves is the true story of an African Prince, who endured the humiliation of slavery without ever losing his dignity or hope for freedom.

$24.99

school media add cart


Race - The Power Of An Illusion (High School Version)

The division of the world's peoples into distinct groups - "red," "black," "white" or "yellow" peoples - has became so deeply imbedded in our psyches, so widely accepted, many would promptly dismiss as crazy any suggestion of its falsity. Yet, that's exactly what this provocative, new three-hour series by California Newsreel claims. Race - The Power of an Illusion questions the very idea of race as biology, suggesting that a belief in race is no more sound than believing that the sun revolves around the earth.

Yet race still matters. Just because race doesn't exist in biology doesn't mean it isn't very real, helping shape life chances and opportunities.

Episode 1- The Difference Between Us examines the contemporary science - including genetics - that challenges our common sense assumptions that human beings can be bundled into three or four fundamentally different groups according to their physical traits.

Episode 2- The Story We Tell uncovers the roots of the race concept in North America, the 19th century science that legitimated it, and how it came to be held so fiercely in the western imagination. The episode is an eye-opening tale of how race served to rationalize, even justify, American social inequalities as "natural."

Episode 3- The House We Live In asks, If race is not biology, what is it? This episode uncovers how race resides not in nature but in politics, economics and culture. It reveals how our social institutions "make" race by disproportionately channeling resources, power, status and wealth to white people.

By asking, What is this thing called 'race'?, a question so basic it is rarely asked, Race - The Power of an Illusion helps set the terms that any further discussion of race must first take into account. Ideal for human biology, anthropology, sociology, American history, American studies, and cultural studies.

$69.95

school media add cart


Race To Freedom: Underground Railroad

In this fictionalized account based on hundreds of true stories of runaway slaves, Thomas (Courtney B. Vance) and Sarah (Janet Bailey) try to escape a North Carolina plantation in the years leading up to the Civil War. Traveling the Underground Railroad with two others, Thomas and Sarah encounter Frederick Douglass (Tim Reid) and Harriet Tubman (Alfre Woodard), among others, on their quest for freedom.

$14.99

school media add cart


Raisin In The Sun, A

In a Chicago tenement in the 1950s, Lena Younger (Phylicia Rashad) and her children, Walter (Sean Combs) and Beneatha (Sanaa Lathan), each hope for a better life in this moving, Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated adaptation of Lorraine Hansberry's play. For Beneatha, that means higher education; Walter sets out to start his own business; and Lena refuses to allow her dream of owning a home to die at the hands of bigoted white neighbors.

Actors: Sean Combs , Phylicia Rashad , Audra McDonald , Sanaa Lathan , John Stamos , Bill Nunn , Sean Patrick Thomas , Justin Martin , Alexandra Cheron , David Oyelowo , Paula Boudreau

$9.95

school media add cart


Raisin in the Sun, A

Sidney Poitier stars in this screen adaptation of the play by Lorraine Hansberry. An insurance check brings conflict and turmoil to the Youngers, a black family living in a small Chicago apartment. Son Walter Lee wants to invest in a liquor store, his widowed mother Lena (Claudia McNeil) wants to buy a house and Lena's daughter (Ruby Dee) wants to complete medical school. Lena makes a small down payment on a house and gives Walter the rest if he'll save some for his sister. He risks it all on the store and loses everything. Walter Lee is soon faced with selling the house to a home-owner's association that pays to keep African-Americans out.

$14.99

school media add cart


Ralph Ellison: Invisible Man, Celebrated Writer

RALPH ELLISON was an African-American writer and essayist, who's only novel INVISIBLE MAN (1953) gained a wide critical success. Ellison's ambitious journey from a childhood of hardship and poverty to celebrated African American writer is chronicled in this inspiring program through exclusive interviews and personal recollection. Invisible Man (1952) addresses issues pertinent to Black society and identity in the 1950's by using the protagonist's desire and determination to be visible as a metaphor for the entire African American community's struggle to be recognized in a world of prejudice and hostility. He remarked that "Literature is Colorblind", using racial issues as a means to express the universal dilemmas of identity and self-discovery. Despite the social and political boundaries in place during the 1950's for a black man with no formal education, Ellison has been compared to such writers as Melville and Hawthorne. Talented in many fields, Ellison also was an accomplished jazz trumpeter and a free-lance photographer. Ellison lectured widely at various American colleges and universities, including Columbia, Yale, Chicago, and New York University. Among Ellison's several awards are the Medal of Freedom (1969), Chevalier de l'Ordre des Artes et Lettres (1970) and 1985 National Medal of Arts.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Remember the Titans (Widescreen)

Based on a true story that took place in Alexandria, Virginia, in 1971, when African-American football coach Herman Boone was hired to guide an integrated, yet racially polarized, high school team, the T.C. Williams Titans. After leading his team to 15 winning seasons, white football coach Bill Yoast is demoted and replaced by Herman Boone -- a tough, black, opinionated and stubborn task master. As the two men learn to overcome their ignorance, bigotry and differences, they realize that they actually have much in common -- including integrity, honor and a strong work ethic. Together, they work together to transform a group of hostile young players into champions. Stars Denzel Washington.

$14.99

school media add cart


Richard Wright - Black Boy (High School Version)

Richard Wright - Black Boy is the first film on the life, work and legacy of Richard Wright. Born outside Natchez, Mississippi in 1908, Wright overcame a childhood of poverty and oppression to become one of America's most influential writers. His first major works, Native Son and Black Boy, were runaway best sellers which are still mainstays of high school and college literature and composition classes. According to critic Irving Howe, "The day Native Son appeared American culture was changed forever."

Three years in the making, underwritten by the National Endowment for the Humanities and produced by Eyes on the Prize veteran Madison D. Lacy, Richard Wright - Black Boy is destined to become a definitive literary biography. It skillfully intercuts dramatic excerpts from Wright's own work with historical footage and the recollections of friends, associates and scholars such as Ralph Ellison, Margaret Walker, and Wright's daughter, Julia. They trace Wright's later development as a writer back to the brutality and racism of his Southern childhood - his father deserted the family, his uncle was lynched and he often went hungry. Wright's indelible portrayal of Bigger Thomas in Native Son and his own autobiography Black Boy lay bare the tragic connection between racism and powerlessness, despair, and self-destructive violence in many black males.

Wright played an important role in many of the important social movements of his time. The film follows his journey through the Chicago black cultural Renaissance of the '30s, the Communist Party during the Depression, the witch-hunts of the McCarthy era and the American expatriate community in Paris in the '50s. This biography urges us to take a fresh look at the often-neglected work of Wright's exile years including The Long Dream and his championing of Pan Africanism and the newly emerging nations of Africa and Asia.

By the time of his mysterious death in 1960 at age 52, Wright had left an indelible mark on African American letters, indeed, on the American imagination. This film biography demonstrates Wright's life-long belief that "words can be weapons against injustice." It will encourage students of American Literature, Black Studies and 20th Century American History to revisit Wright's work with fresh enthusiasm and deepened understanding.

$69.95

school media add cart


Richard Wright: Native Son, Author and Activist

RICHARD WRIGHT was an African-American author of novels, short stories and non-fiction that dealt with powerful themes and controversial topics. Much of his works concerned racial themes that helped redefine discussions of race relations in America in the mid-20th century. Born on a plantation in Mississippi, Wright was a descendent of the first slaves who arrived in Jamestown Massachusetts. This program follows his arduous path from sharecropper to literary giant. Through authors like H.L. Menken, Sinclair Lewis, Theodore Dreiser, he discovered that literature could be used as a catalyst for social change. In 1937 Wright moved to New York and his work began to garner national attention for it's political and social commentary. Much of Wright's writing focused on the African American community and experience; his novel Native Son won him a Guggenheim Fellowship and was adapted to the Broadway stage with Orson Welles directing in 1941. In 1946, Wright was fed up with America's treatment of its black citizens and became an expatriate in Paris, France where he joined a circle that included famous Existentialists Jean-Paul Sarte and Albert Camus. Though he quit his formal education at only 15 years old, Richard Wright was a major influence on world literature & politics, and brought the black experience to the forefront of social discourse.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Rise And Fall Of Jim Crow, The (High School Version)

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow offers the first comprehensive look at race relations in America between the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement. This definitive four-part series documents a brutal and oppressive era rooted in the growing refusal of many Southern states to grant slaves freed in the Civil War equal rights with whites. A life of crushing limitation for Southern Blacks, defined by legal segregation known as "Jim Crow" - after a minstrel routine in which whites painted their faces black - shaped the social, political and legal history of the period. In 1954, with the Supreme Court decision in Brown vs. Board of Education, the Jim Crow laws and way of life began to fall.

The story of the struggle during Jim Crow is told through the eyes of those who experienced it. Some are historical figures such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells and Walter White. Others are everyday local heroes like William Holtzclaw, Charlotte Hawkins Brown, Ned Cobb, "Pap" Singleton and Barbara Johns.

Program One: Promises Betrayed (1865 - 1896)
How did Jim Crow begin? As Reconstruction ended, African Americans' efforts to assert their constitutional rights began to be repressed at every turn, betraying the promises of Emancipation. Southern whites were embolden by the North's withdrawal of support for Black access to land, civil and economic rights, and due process in law and politics. Whites passed laws that segregated, divested and disfranchised African-Americans -- laws that were enforced with violence and terror. This episode recounts the Black response by documenting the work of such leaders as anti-lynching crusader Ida B. Wells and the emergence of Booker T. Washington as a national figure.

Program Two: Fighting Back (1896 - 1917)
Episode two illustrates the early rise of a successful Black middle class and the determination of white supremacists to destroy fledgling Black political power. The growing oppression had a profound effect on a professor at Atlanta University, W.E.B. Du Bois, and a teenage mail carrier named Walter White. Both would become leaders of a newly founded organization to fight Jim Crow: the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. The episode ends with the violence at home giving way to warfare abroad as thousands of Black Americans depart for battle in World War I.

Program Three: Don't Shout Too Soon (1917 - 1940)
In the aftermath of World War I a new round of race riots and lynching broke out, yet this was also a time of increasing strength for Black resistance movements. Episode three chronicles the years between the wars as a time of massive Black migration out of the South and continuing conflict within it. By the 1930's many African-Americans found their sole support from Socialists and Communists, who helped organize tenant farmers and sharecroppers and defended the "Scottsboro Boys," nine Black youths falsely accused of rape. While NAACP counsel Charles Houston began a lengthy legal campaign designed to chip away at Jim Crow, Walter White waged war in the court of public opinion. As the world plunged toward World War II, Black labor leaders like A. Philip Randolph demanded an end to segregation in defense industries. Singer, actor and activist Paul Robeson declared that, "Change is in the air."

Program Four: Terror and Triumph (1940 - 1954)
Episode four examines the surge of Black activism that took place after World War II. Black veterans returned from the war determined to achieve the same rights at home that they had fought for in Europe in a Jim Crow army. One vet, Medgar Evers, became an organizer for the Mississippi NAACP; he was assassinated for his work in 1963. In Georgia, John Wesley Dobbs, head of the Black Masons, organized the first voter-registration drives. Predictably, whites again answered Black demands for equality with violence. But this time, President Truman responded with a civil rights initiative and integrated the Army. Southern Democrats split from the Democratic Party forming the States Rights Party.

But slowly the national mood was changing. Barriers fell in sports and entertainment. Here, for the first time on film, those who had been high school students in Farmville, VA reconstruct their historic walk-out and protest against segregated and inadequate education. They galvanized the community to join in an NAACP lawsuit that was combined with four other NAACP suits across the country to become Brown v. Board of Education. The landmark Brown decision irreparably breached the legal basis for Jim Crow, and through that opening soon poured the legions of the Civil Rights Movement.

$149.00

school media add cart


Road To Brown, The (High School Version)

The Road to Brown tells the story of the Brown v. Board of Education ruling as the culmination of a brilliant legal assault on segregation that launched the Civil Rights movement. It is also a moving and long overdue tribute to a visionary but little known black lawyer, Charles Hamilton Houston, "the man who killed Jim Crow."

The Road to Brown plunges us into the nightmare world of Jim Crow that robbed former slaves of the rights granted by the 14th and 15th Amendments. Under the "separate but equal" doctrine of the Supreme Court's 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson decision, black citizens were denied the right to vote, to attend white schools, to get sick in white hospitals or to be buried in white cemeteries. Those who objected were liable to be lynched.

Charles Houston, the first black editor of the Harvard Law Review, dean of Howard University Law School and chief counsel to the NAACP, launched a number of precedent-setting cases leading up to Brown v. Board of Education. He strategically targeted segregated education as the key to undermining the entire Jim Crow system.

Interviews with his associates recount how Houston, eschewing the limelight himself, energized a generation of black jurists including future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall to wage the struggle against segregation. He taught: "A lawyer is either a social engineer or he is a parasite on society."

Houston died of a heart attack in 1950, just four years before the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision validated his strategy. In a moving climax, the film recapitulates the arguments before the Court, Justice Warren's opinion striking down Plessy, and the jubilant reactions of black America. Other legal victories followed.

But Charles Houston had warned, "There's a difference between law on the books and the law in action." We witness how it was the civil rights movement, organized in the wake of Brown, that gave teeth to the new laws.

Moving from slavery to civil rights, The Road to Brown provides a concise history of how African-Americans finally won full legal equality under the Constitution. Its depiction of the interplay between race, law and history adds a crucial dimension to courses in U.S. History, Black Studies, Constitutional Law, Law & Society, Social Movements and Government. It opens up a discussion of the true significance of the Brown v. Board decision on the path towards racial equality. The example of Charles Houston's persistence and determination will inspire today's students to take America further down the long road to social justice.

$69.95

school media add cart


Rosa Parks

Civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks is remembered as a courageous woman whose defiance in the face of segregation helped inspire the architects of the civil rights movement and set an example for generations to follow.

She saw the inherent evil in segregation and she had the courage to fight it in its common place, a seat on a bus.

Rosa Parks, a former seamstress, became the first woman to lie in honor in the Capital Rotunda, sharing the tribute bestowed upon Abraham Lincoln, John F. Kennedy and other national leaders.

This informative program chronicles the life of Rosa Parks.

$24.95

school media add cart           


Rosa Parks: The First Lady of the Civil Rights Movement

Civil rights activist Rosa Parks, was born a granddaughter to former slaves, on February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama. Her refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on a Montgomery, Alabama bus in December of 1955, spurred a city-wide boycott and unleashed nationwide efforts to end segregation of public facilities. Her brave and unwavering determination proved monumental. Rosa was prepared to sacrifice everything, making her the role model of Racial Injustice and The First Lady of the Civil Rights Movement. Parks' act of defiance and the Montgomery Bus Boycott became the catalyst that helped launch important symbols of the modern Civil Rights Movement. It inspired all freedom loving people to join together against oppressive laws and governments, racial discrimination and hatred. She became an international icon of resistance to racial segregation. Her determination and perseverance became a focal point with civil rights leaders, including Edgar Nixon, president of the local chapter of the NAACP; and Martin Luther King, Jr. In 1964 Congress passed the Civil Rights Act - legislation that outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Rosa Parks received many accolades during her lifetime, including the NAACP's highest award the Spingarn Medal, the Presidential Medal of Freedom the Congressional Gold Medal. Rosa died in 1977 and was chosen as the first woman ever to lie in honor at the Capitol Rotunda.

$64.95

school media add cart           


Selma

SELMA is the story of a movement. The film chronicles the tumultuous three-month period in 1965, when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led a dangerous campaign to secure equal voting rights in the face of violent opposition. The epic march from Selma to Montgomery culminated in President Johnson (Tom Wilkinson) signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the most significant victories for the civil rights movement. Director Ava DuVernay's SELMA tells the real story of how the revered leader and visionary Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (David Oyelowo) and his brothers and sisters in the movement prompted change that forever altered history.

$12.98

school media add cart


Selma, Lord, Selma

Disney presents this live-action feature starring Jurnee Smollett, Clifton Powell and Mackenzie Astin, based on a true story about events leading up to the civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery in 1965. A young Alabama schoolgirl (Smollett) is inspired by the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to fight racism in her community. (Note: Rated TV-PG)

$9.95

school media add cart


Shirley Chisholm: First Black Congresswoman

SHIRLEY CHISHOLM born 1924 in Brooklyn, N.Y. is the first Black woman elected to the U.S. Congress and the first to campaign for the Presidency. She was an outspoken advocate for women and minorities during the seven terms she served in the House. Her legacy of political and social activism laid the foundation for the rise of women and Blacks in American politics. "Of my two "handicaps" being female put more obstacles in my path than being black." This program is a celebration of her life and a political diary from the 1960's through the 1970's during an era of political transition and social change. The range of Chisholm's activism is explored in depth through her involvement in civil rights, women's rights, and the anti-Vietnam War efforts. We witness the excitement firsthand of Chisholm announcing her candidacy for President with the Democratic Party in 1972, declaring she is not a representative solely of the black or female communities, but "a candidate of the people". Though she did not win the nomination that year, she remained active in politics and served the House of Representatives until her retirement in 1982. In this inspiring program, Shirley Chisholm emerges as a charismatic leader and social reformer that achieved positive change in American politics and society for future generations.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Something The Lord Made

Something the Lord Made tells the emotional true story of two men who defied the rules of their time to launch a medical revolution, set against the backdrop of the Jim Crow south. Working in 1940s Baltimore on an unprecedented technique for performing heart surgery on "blue babies," Dr. Alfred Blalock (Alan Rickman) and lab technician Vivien Thomas (Mos Def) form an impressive team. As Blalock and Thomas invent a new field of medicine, saving thousands of lives in the process, social pressures threaten to undermine their collaboration and tear their friendship apart.

$14.98

school media add cart


Standing Up for Freedom: Rosa Parks and the Civil Rights Movement

This educational, live-action program chronicles the life of Rosa Parks, looking at how her single act of civil disobedience helped to change the course of history. Featuring dramatic reenactments and archival photographs, the program looks at Parks' life before and after the momentous December day when she refused to yield her seat on a segregated city bus to a white man, setting off a peaceful revolution that changed America forever.

$39.95

school media add cart           


Story of Gospel Music, The

From Mahalia Jackson to Aretha Franklin to Shirley Caesar, these performances offer a fascinating look into the origins of gospel music. Vintage recordings and modern performances highlight this song-filled history of an American art form.

$19.98

school media add cart


That's Black Entertainment Set

Beginning in the 1920s, an alternative movie industry sprang up in the black community. Hosted by Mario Van Peebles, this three-disc series presents a trio of vintage African-American films -- Jericho (1937), Boarding House Blues (1948) and The Bronze Buckaroo (1939) -- highlighting the contributions of black performers in dramatic acting, comedies and Westerns. Featured pioneers include Paul Robeson, Herbert Jeffrey and Ossie Davis.

$19.95

school media add cart


Thurgood Marshall: Justice for All

As a civil rights lawyer in the '40s and '50s, he turned the floor of the Supreme Court into his personal battleground. As a member of the court, he presided over some of the most influential decisions in American history.

Thurgood Marshall grew up with a strong sense of justice and the courage to fight for his convictions. While a mid-century black lawyer, he traveled the South as a lonely warrior in the battle to end discrimination, the embodiment of hope for black Americans. Through archival footage, period accounts, and candid interviews with colleagues and family, THURGOOD MARSHALL: JUSTICE FOR ALL chronicles the monumental life of the first African American to sit on the Supreme Court.

BIOGRAPHY proudly presents the comprehensive story of the legendary jurist and civil rights activist who stood up for his beliefs and watched them triumph.

DVD Features: Interactive Menus; Scene Selection

$24.95

school media add cart


Thurgood Marshall: America's First African American Supreme Court Justice

The great grandson of a slave, Thurgood Marshall was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on July 2, 1908. At the age of 25, Marshall graduated first in his class from Howard Law and joined the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the nation's largest and oldest civil rights organization. As NAACP counsel, Marshall used the constitution to successfully argue for a slew of rights now taken for granted, and forced the University of Maryland Law School to admit its first black student, just five years after that same school had rejected Marshall due to his race. Between 1940 and 1961 Marshall won 29 of the 32 cases he argued before the Supreme Court, the most significant being the landmark case, Brown v Board of Education. Marshall argued that separate school systems for blacks and whites were inherently unequal, violating the "equal protection clause" of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. In September 1961, President John F. Kennedy appointed Marshall a judge on the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. In 1965, President Lyndon Johnson named Marshall the nation's first black Solicitor General to conduct government legal action before the Supreme Court. Two years later on October 2, 1967 at the age of 59, Marshall became the first African American to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. President Lyndon Johnson who declared it was "the right thing to do, the right time to do it, the right man and the right place." He never forgot where he came from, consistently ruling in favor of the rights of "organized labor, racial minorities, the advancement of women, the broadening of rights to freedom of expression, and the narrowing of police authority." Harvard Law Professor Randall L. Kennedy wrote. "No member of the Supreme Court has ever been more keenly alive to social inequalities." He remained a champion of individual liberty. As more conservative justices were appointed by Presidents Nixon, Ford and Reagan, he became known as "The Great Dissenter," but remained unwavering in his commitment to liberal precepts. In increasingly poor health, on June 27, 1991 Marshall submitted his resignation to President George H. W. Bush. He was replaced by conservative black Justice Clarence Thomas. Marshall died of heart failure on January 24, 1993 at the age of 84. He was buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Posthumously Thurgood Marshall was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, America's highest civilian award by President Bill Clinton in November 1993. His words govern how the United States extends its rights to this day.

$64.95

school media add cart           


Tribute To Alvin Ailey, A

This program discusses the key role Alvin Ailey played in modern dance in America.

$29.95

school media add cart


Tuskegee Airmen: They Fought Two Wars

This inspiring World War II story spotlights 450 men who fought on two fronts at once. Black American aviators, known as the Tuskegee Airmen, battled Axis powers in Europe and North Africa and then took on racism at home. Trained by the segregated military system as an experiment to see if blacks could fly in combat, these pilots made more than 15,000 sorties and 1,500 missions. Their success led to the integration of the U.S. armed forces.

$19.98

school media add cart


Two Nations of Black America, The

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. explores the gap between the upper and lower classes of black America and probes why it has happened. Reviewing the thirty years that have passed since the death of Martin Luther King, Jr., Gates shows that while many blacks reaped the reward of the civil rights movement, just as many were left behind in an expanding underclass of poverty. Featuring interviews with Cornel West, Eldridge Cleaver, Angela Davis and more.

$24.99

school media add cart


Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson

This two-part documentary follows Jack Johnson's journey from his beginnings as the son of former slaves, to his entry into the brutal world of professional boxing, where, in turn-of-the century Jim Crow America, the heavyweight champion was an exclusively "white title." Despite the odds, Johnson was able to batter his way up through the ranks, and in 1908 he became the first African-American to earn the title Heavyweight Champion of the World.

$24.99

school media add cart


Whispers Of Angels: A Story Of The Underground Railroad

Defiant, brave and free, the great abolitionists Thomas Garrett, William Still and Harriet Tubman, along with hundreds of lesser known and nameless opponents of slavery, formed a Corridor of Courage stretching from Maryland's eastern shore through the length of Delaware to Philadelphia and beyond -- making the Underground Railroad a real route to freedom for enslaved Americans before the Civil War.

Long-format interviews with prominent historians blend with dramatic reenactment to create a powerful story about the fight to end slavery. Actors Edward Asner and Blair Underwood portray the two most prominent abolitionists on the eastern line of the Underground Railroad, Thomas Garrett and William Still. Bearing a remarkable resemblance to Thomas Garrett, Asner reenacts the famous courtroom scene in 1848 in which Garrett foreshadows the Civil War and firmly declares to redouble his efforts in fighting for true freedom in America. In spite of the court's imposition of a crippling financial punishment, Garrett's ideals were not altered; his clandestine activities continued for many years even during the War. Reading documented text in the form of letters exchanged by Thomas Garrett and William Still (a free black abolitionist in Philadelphia), Asner and Underwood bring to life the fascinating working relationship between the two men and those they helped. Underwood, as William Still, meets in secret with the frightened fugitives who pass through his Anti-Slavery Society Offices in Philadelphia on their dangerous journeys to the north.

$24.99

school media add cart


With All Deliberate Speed

History ignored is history repeated. On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the case of Brown Vs. Board of Education that the concept of "separate but equal" school segregation was unconstitutional. But in this landmark ruling, the Justices used a four-word phrase that many believe has delayed the process of change for over 50 years: "With All Deliberate Speed."

Direct Peter Gilbert (producer of Hoop Dreams and Stevie) explores the shocking history and legacy of the legal decision that tore our nation apart and still divides us today. Jeffrey Wright narrates this acclaimed documentary featuring stunning archive footage, powerful readings by Mekhi Phifer, Larenz Tate, Terry Kinney, and Alicia Keys, and revealing new interviews with the heroic men and women who fought - and still fight - the battle for racial equality in America.

$19.98

school media add cart


Zora's Roots

This program examines the life of author and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston. The film follows Hurston, best known for her novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God, to the subtropical paradise that shaped her childhood and her life's work - where she returned again and again for inspiration and solace. This documentary tells her story through the people who knew her and the places and events that she brought to the world through her writing.

$24.99

school media add cart


 

 

 

School Media Associates

Producers:

A&E Video
Ambrose Video
Clearvue
Crystal Productions
Discovery School
Disney Educational
Educational Video Network
Films Media Group
GPN Educational Media
Hawkhill Associates
Human Relations Media
Intelecom
Kultur International
Language Tree
Learning Seed
Learning ZoneXpress
Monterey Media
National Geographic
Nest Family
New Dimensions Media
PBS Video
Schlessinger Media
Standard Deviants
TMW Media Group
Teachers Video Company
WGBH Boston

Click here for more Producers...